Pigeon English (Kobo eBook)

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Description


Man Booker Prize Finalist: A “winning and ingenious” novel about an eleven-year-old immigrant boy trying to solve a murder (The Plain Dealer).
 
Lying in front of Harrison Opoku is a body. It is the body of one of his classmates, a boy known for his incredible basketball skills, who seems to have been murdered for his dinner.
 
Armed with a pair of camouflage binoculars and techniques absorbed from television shows like CSI, Harri and his best friend, Dean, plot to bring the perpetrator to justice. They gather evidence—fingerprints lifted with tape, a wallet stained with blood—and lay traps to flush out the killer. But nothing can prepare them for what happens when a criminal feels you closing in.
 
Recently emigrated from Ghana with his sister and mother to South London’s enormous housing projects, Harri is obsessed with gummy candy, friendly to the pigeon who visits his balcony, is quite possibly the fastest runner in his school, and is clearly also fast on the trail of a murderer. “[A] work of deep sympathy and imagination,” Pigeon English is a tale of friendship and adventure, as Harri finds wonder, mystery, and danger in his new, ever-expanding world (The Boston Globe).
 
Pigeon English is a book to fall in love with: a funny book, a true book, a shattering book. . . . If you loved Mark Haddon’s The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time or Emma Donoghue’s Man Booker–shortlisted Room, you’ll love this book too.” —The Times (London)
 
“Convincingly evokes life on the edge . . . The humour, the resilience, the sheer ebullience of its narrator—a hero for our times—should ensure the book becomes, deservedly, a classic.” —The Mail on Sunday
 
“Continually surprising and endearing . . . There’s a sweetness here that’s irresistible.” —*The *Washington Post
 
“Funny and poignant . . . What might be described as Diary of a Wimpy Kid meets Trainspotting.” —Toronto Star
 
“Since Nancy Drew and the Hardy Boys, there have been certain rules observed when children play detective. Stephen Kelman throws them all out . . . The mystery is secondary to the pleasures of listening to Harri.” —The Christian Science Monitor